Category: Issue 02

Camping

Camping

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Rine Boyer graduated from Reed College in Portland Oregon where she recieved a liberal arts education. Deciding to focus her studies on people rather than books she moved to Chicago where she has found a variety of characters and neighborhoods. Eventually settling in Bridgeport, a neighborhood that has been home to many of Chicago’s politicians as well as a growing arts community, she set up her studio in the Zhou B Arts Center.  Rine participates in local shows, her most recent being solo exhibitions at the Old Town Art Center and ARC Gallery. Recognition of her work includes a juror’s award at the Beverly Arts Center and an honorable mention at the Rockford Midwestern exhibit held at the Rockford Art Museum. Reviews of her work have been featured in Newcity, Gaper’s Block, and SOBS.org.

For more information, please visit http://www.rineboyer.com

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Issue Two, June 3, 2013

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Poetry

“Poem for Horses & Bayonets”
“An Ounce of Prevention”
“Vexillology”– Michael Robins

Free Mumia Cheesesteaks” –  Leonard Kress

“were tempestuously agitated, and nodded thrice, as if bowed by some invisible wearer”  – Emily Bludworth de Barrios

“The Broken Testimony” – Daniel Borzutzky

“Curtain Design for Victory over Sun”
“Short Talk About Freud”
“Star Nemesis” – David Lau

“Profession”
“Proximity is the Greatest Motivator of Fear” – Joshua Gottlieb-Miller

“Missed Connections”
“Bonjour Tristesse” – Christopher Kempf

“Most Wanted”
“Mythos” – Phillip B. Williams

“Cheval de Frise and Gone-Sweetness at the All-Inclusive” – Elizabyth A. Hiscox

“College”
“A Briefe and True Report of  Tiananmen Square ” – Kara Candito

from “the Depression” – Mathias Svalina

Prose

“A Warm and Blue Day in Our Nation of Nations” – Charles McLeod

Work by Featured Artist Rine Boyer

Camping
Pruning
Campaign Managers
Client Service Engineer

Cover Art Credit

Rine Boyer, “Client Service Engineer,” “Campaign Managers,” “Camping,” and “Pruning”

Rine Boyer graduated from Reed College in Portland Oregon where she recieved a liberal arts education. Deciding to focus her studies on people rather than books she moved to Chicago where she has found a variety of characters and neighborhoods. Eventually settling in Bridgeport, a neighborhood that has been home to many of Chicago’s politicians as well as a growing arts community, she set up her studio in the Zhou B Arts Center.  Rine participates in local shows, her most recent being solo exhibitions at the Old Town Art Center and ARC Gallery. Recognition of her work includes a juror’s award at the Beverly Arts Center and an honorable mention at the Rockford Midwestern exhibit held at the Rockford Art Museum. Reviews of her work have been featured in Newcity, Gaper’s Block, and SOBS.org.

For more information, please visit http://www.rineboyer.com

Pruning

Pruning (2)

 

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Rine Boyer graduated from Reed College in Portland Oregon where she recieved a liberal arts education. Deciding to focus her studies on people rather than books she moved to Chicago where she has found a variety of characters and neighborhoods. Eventually settling in Bridgeport, a neighborhood that has been home to many of Chicago’s politicians as well as a growing arts community, she set up her studio in the Zhou B Arts Center.  Rine participates in local shows, her most recent being solo exhibitions at the Old Town Art Center and ARC Gallery. Recognition of her work includes a juror’s award at the Beverly Arts Center and an honorable mention at the Rockford Midwestern exhibit held at the Rockford Art Museum. Reviews of her work have been featured in Newcity, Gaper’s Block, and SOBS.org.

For more information, please visit http://www.rineboyer.com

Poem for Horses & Bayonets

We woke & named insect, animal
& trees. We spent time in gardens

gardening, tending a tethered pet:
its manners informed our voices.

Pedigree, fine huntsmen we were
not. Many trophied prey, in fact,

were our friends. By their example
we prayed always our visions full.

Pulled in two, easily as wishbones
who were we kidding? A number

settled our dilemmas &, therefore,
was mutual loss. Our worst kinds

grew brawn, so we forgave spring
or forgave fall. Along a stone fence

we waited days to swim. Otherwise
the cards were stacked in our favor.

We bloomed with the yellow roses
& disaster. We were vespers for it.

No running nor fooling. No panic
nor effect for our town was a stage,

our bridges like stations of a cross.
Our ghostly streets like presidents.

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Michael Robins is the author of three collections of poetry, most recently Ladies & Gentlemen (Saturnalia Books, 2011) and In Memory of Brilliance & Value (Saturnalia, 2015). He teaches literature and creative writing at Columbia College Chicago.

An Ounce of Prevention

The soldiers hurrying past you
stow a leather briefcase. Inside

rests a file, thick, & bears names
like midnight towering a valley.

You swear for rabbits to come
& stretch the pedal down. You

borrow books & comb feelings
inversely to the heart, pillbox

flesh when pages buzz into rage
for weather mends accordingly.

In the file as well are the nights
old men leaned from their work

to hear the bugle sound. You’ve
injured those dearest, your hair

again the odd wing descending.
In the end you’ll be memorized.

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Michael Robins is the author of three collections of poetry, most recently Ladies & Gentlemen (Saturnalia Books, 2011) and In Memory of Brilliance & Value (Saturnalia, 2015). He teaches literature and creative writing at Columbia College Chicago.

Vexillology

Empathy rose like a series of icebergs.
Were we distracted? Linens needed

changing, we realized a few desserts
would go uneaten, remain untouched.

When we parked the truck, the truck
got towed (this happens almost daily).

We walked the tracks back into town,
otherwise we might be screwed. We

brushed imperfect teeth: we squeezed
big tubes of paste into the little tubes.

We were the seven o’clock numbers
& we were taking up air. We realized

women coming & going in narratives
paired, walked in bars toward a joke.

Our friends had other, better friends,
convictions, frost advisories in effect.

Lamplight & rotgut, our days passed
without thinking once about that war.

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Michael Robins is the author of three collections of poetry, most recently Ladies & Gentlemen (Saturnalia Books, 2011) and In Memory of Brilliance & Value (Saturnalia, 2015). He teaches literature and creative writing at Columbia College Chicago.